Tag: Religious Regulations

Blog Entries

Internet Regulations Six Months On

Due to the licensing and real-name requirements, these regulations… certainly make it more difficult for individuals and unregistered churches to put religious content online.

Chinese Church Voices

Three Trends in the Post-Pandemic Church in China (2)

“More small groups, more household-oriented, and more online.”

Chinese Church Voices

Three Trends in the Post-Pandemic Church in China (1)

“More small groups, more household-oriented, and more online.”

Chinese Church Voices

Churches Seeking to Stay Online

New regulations governing online religious content came into effect on March 1 of this year. If strictly enforced, the regulations could severely restrict the use of online tools for ministry and outreach by Christians in China. Here's a brief update on how churches are responding.

Blog Entries

Raising the Walls of the Sandbox

As churches in China experience continued tightening, it’s worth considering the wider context of the measures and what their broader purpose is.

Blog Entries

A New Year for Those Living in China’s New Normal

As we end one year and begin a new one, it’s time to look back and reflect—and take a deep breath, bracing ourselves for what is to come in 2022. And as we look back and prepare for the future, we do so with open hearts and anticipation, and with awareness of the world around us.

Blog Entries

Religious Activities by Foreigners

Draft Regulations

What's in the draft regulations and what might they mean for foreign Christians living in China?

Blog Entries

3 Questions: Sinicization or Chinafication?

More new religious regulations? What do they mean for the church in China?

Chinese Church Voices

Clarifying the Boundary between Church and State

Unified with the historic Christ who humbled himself, the church should be humble and suffering in this generation, bearing witness for the gospel. Only such a path is the true path of the cross of the Chinese church.

Chinese Church Voices

The Boundary between the Church and State

Over the past year, prominent house churches in China were shut down by government authorities stirring up questions about how the church and state in China should interact. How can the church be the church in this environment? Where is the line between the church and the state?