Tag: Narratives

Blog Entries

Christianity and the State—Dispelling a Myth

Embedded in today’s evangelical China narratives, particularly the narrative of the persecuted church, is the assumption that regime change will inevitably bring about greater openness for the gospel in China. But is that what Chinese history tells us?

Blog Entries

Finding Themselves in China

It has been said that for the person who has a hammer, everything looks like a nail.

For foreigners who go to China, it is often the case that what they find depends on what they’ve come looking for.

Blog Entries

God, Caesar, and the Chinese Legal System

Western narratives about China and its church are built on a fundamental, but often unspoken, assumption about the relationship between law and society.

Blog Entries

Formed by Our Narratives

These narratives can also have a distorting effect upon those who employ them, for our China stories speak to more than simply what we think about China; they also reveal what we desire.

Blog Entries

When Our China Stories Ring Hollow

Thoughts about the violent demonstrations on the U.S. Capitol earlier this month.

Blog Entries

Variations on a Theme

Our China stories are not merely descriptions of an objective reality manifesting itself in the Chinese church; they speak to where we believe China’s church is (or should be) going.

Blog Entries

Seeing Things Differently

In proposing that we need to get beyond the “persecuted church” narrative, I am not advocating . . . that we leave it behind completely, but rather that we recognize its limits.

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One Virus, Two Cities

If the global pandemic has laid bare our shared vulnerability, then it has also highlighted our interdependence as global citizens.

Blog Entries

Stopping the Spread

Those partnering with China’s emerging missions movement would do well to consider what they may be passing on without even realizing it. Careful filtering of concepts and methods—but more importantly, values and unspoken assumptions—could help guard China’s future mission leaders from replicating painful mistakes.