Tag: Contextualization

Blog Entries

Dragons and Devotion: Bridging Cultural Heritage with Christian Faith

I am not Chinese, and yet I was so helped by this exploration of the Year of the Dragon. And I realize that for my Chinese Christian brothers and sisters this series of articles may have produced a much deeper sense of relief than mine. For this I am grateful and looking forward to an eternity in which I can know them better.

Blog Entries

Taking Confucian Spirituality Seriously

The Renovation of the Heart in Dallas Willard and Zhu Xi

We should not erect an artificial barrier to sharing the gospel of Jesus by insisting on a Western language that non-Christians in Asia are not familiar with. Jesus is the answer, yes, but to what questions? East Asian people have a rich tradition of spiritual formation in the general sense of renovating the heart.

Blog Entries

Human Flourishing in Chinese Thought: A Christian Response

Lecture Video Recording

Enjoy the recording of I’Ching Thomas’ lecture, “Human Flourishing in Chinese Thought: A Christian Response.” Drawing on themes from her book Jesus the Path to Human Flourishing, I’Ching explored the notion of human flourishing in Chinese thought, focusing especially on Confucius’ teaching on self-cultivation and benevolence as keys to achieving the ideal of the Noble Man.

Blog Entries

American Evangelicalism and China: A Necessary Conversation

Addressing his readers in China, Ren Xiaopeng asks, “If American evangelicalism is in such an intellectually vacant state, where would Chinese Christianity, deeply influenced by American evangelicalism and fundamentalism, go next?” Their answer will be critical for the future of the Chinese church—and, if we are willing to listen, for the church in America as well.

Chinese Church Voices

From Auspicious Dragon to Christian Devil

The Metamorphosis of Myth into Faith

In his reflection on cultural heritage, Rev. Chow acknowledges that while no one has physically seen a dragon, it stands as a potent spiritual symbol for the Chinese, embodying a complex and profound mix of emotions—a reverence filled with honor and dignity. Rather than dismissing the dragon for its mythical nature, Rev. Chow proposes that we "value it doubly, as an integral part of our treasured traditions."

Blog Entries

Taking Another Look at the Chinese Dragon

Chinese Christians are not only receivers of traditional culture but also reformers of contemporary culture and creators of emerging culture. When reflecting on the complex relationship between the gospel and culture, we need a grand and holistic Christian worldview, capable of carrying the gospel’s tolerance of, challenge for, and renewal of culture.

Blog Entries

Dragons: Friend or Foe?

Reflections on the Year of the Dragon

The Bible presents us with good reasons both for celebrating dragons and for slaying them. Insofar as they represent those unfallen throne guardians of heaven, they should be duly revered; and insofar as they represent that fallen seraph Satan, they should be crushed underfoot.

Events

Human Flourishing in Chinese Thought: A Christian Response

On April 5, in the gorgeous Nazareth Chapel at the University of Northwestern-St.Paul, I’Ching Thomas delivered a fascinating lecture titled “Human Flourishing in Chinese Thought: A Christian Response.”  Drawing on themes from her book Jesus: the Path to Human Flourishing, I’Ching explored the notion of human flourishing in Chinese thought, focusing especially on Confucius’ teaching on self-cultivation and benevolence […]

Blog Entries

Taking Chinese Spirituality Seriously

Engaging with Confucian, Daoist, and Buddhist Spiritualities

Christians need to acknowledge a fact. We might disagree on whether Confucianism is a religion or not. But Confucianism, together with Daoism and Buddhism, are spiritual traditions that have provided “chicken soup” for Chinese souls for more than two thousand years.

Blog Entries

An Aesthetic Dance: When the Poet Haizi Meets with Jesus

It was a strong resonance with Haizi’s profound search for homecoming and the “violent extremeness” (冲击极限) of death that led me to walk again with this poet.... This time, however, the journey is alongside the path of Jesus on his way home in Luke’s gospel.