Tag: Book Review

Blog Entries

Chinese Migrants in the Americas

At the Intersection of Resilience, Marginalization, and Hope

For all those who are of mixed-race descent and are looking to find threads of meaning in this conflictual experience, this account not only demonstrates what can be possible at the edges of luck, community, and political agency—but also the horrors of what can take place when monocultural and supremacist ideologies are enacted thus preventing the co-creation of communities of belonging for all.

Blog Entries

The Earliest Chinese Christianity Brought Back to Life

Readers [of Jingjiao] will not only be equipped with the fascinating history of Jingjiao, which helps overcome the anti-Christian narrative that Christianity was brought into China by European and American colonial imperialists. Christians and missionaries in various global cultural contexts will also benefit from this book by learning from the Church of the East missionaries’ creative strategies of inculturation.

Blog Entries

Telling the Truth in China

A Book Review of Sparks

At its most basic level, Sparks presents readers with a host of remarkable women and men who persist in talking about what really happened. In an environment focused on silencing certain aspects of the past, these are the stories of the Chinese citizens who say the quiet part out loud.

Blog Entries

Chinese Christianity Endures, Part 2

Learning from the 18th-Century Church Under Authoritarian Rule

Given China’s place in the world order today, it is very unlikely that they will completely ban all foreigners.... We can be confident that no matter how few the foreigners or how persecuted the flock, our God who makes the rocks cry out in testimony will ensure that his witness is never silenced, and his kingdom continues to advance.

Blog Entries

Chinese Christianity Endures, Part 1

Studying the 18th-Century Church under Authoritarian Rule

The study then takes a closer look at the brief emergence of a comparatively Chinese underground church…before concluding with a fascinating reflection on martyrdom, comparing the Chinese notion of suffering perseverance motivated by filial loyalty to the saints who have gone before with the European concept of sacrificing one’s life for the gospel.

Book Reviews

A Framework for Digital Evangelism

Dr. Harris and Reed’s relational approach applies for individuals to begin relationships with Chinese people in various online spaces and understand their needs. The content of the book needs to be further contextualized for a local Chinese audience, where relationship building will have more nuances in both cultural and digital landscapes.

Blog Entries

How Should We Care for Orphans in China?

Adoption—a foundational metaphor of the Christian faith and a challenging topic in the world, especially when intertwined with China’s one-child policy era, international complications, and issues of identity for adoptees. In this collection from the archives, we’ve pulled together reflections, book reviews, and analysis to open up our perspective on adoption from China.

Book Reviews

A Pentecostal Perspective on the Chinese Union Version

Drawing on his background as a distinguished New Testament scholar and his years of service in China, Menzies addresses important issues that impact the translation of New Testament terms, particularly those related to the work of the Spirit or other Pentecostal themes.

Blog Entries

7 Women Who Braved a Chaotic China

Through the Valley of the Shadow: Australian Women in War-torn China

The women were among the bravest missionaries to serve in China… The authors describe…fending off bandits, experiencing bombing, walking miles and miles to get food, enduring flea bombs dropped on their city, hiding in the woods from violent mobs, and more.

Blog Entries

Chinese Migrants in the Stew Pot of Dubai

A Book Review of Chinese in Dubai

The religious environment [in Dubai] prompts many Chinese expatriates to do some soul-searching… For Muslims… it has meant being in an environment where they are …part of a majority… They feel the pressure of having to be “good citizens” …as they are unofficial ambassadors.