Brent Fulton

Brent Fulton

Brent Fulton is the founder of ChinaSource.

Dr. Fulton served as the first president of ChinaSource until 2019. Prior to his service with ChinaSource, he served from 1995 to 2000 as the managing director of the Institute for Chinese Studies at Wheaton College. From 1987 to 1995 he served as founding US director of China Ministries International, and from 1985 to 1986 as the English publications editor for the Chinese Church Research Center in Hong Kong.

Dr. Fulton holds MA and PhD degrees in political science from the University of Southern California and a BA in radio-TV-film from Messiah College.

An avid China watcher, Dr. Fulton has written and taught extensively on the church in China and on Chinese social and political phenomena. He is the author of China's Urban Christians: A Light That Cannot Be Hidden and co-authored China's Next Generation: New China, New Church, New World with Luis Bush. He is currently working on a new book on Western narratives about the church in China.

Dr. Fulton and his wife, Jasmine, previously lived in Hong Kong from 2006 to 2017. They currently reside in southern California.

Blog Entries

Finding Themselves in China

It has been said that for the person who has a hammer, everything looks like a nail.

For foreigners who go to China, it is often the case that what they find depends on what they’ve come looking for.

Blog Entries

God, Caesar, and the Chinese Legal System

Western narratives about China and its church are built on a fundamental, but often unspoken, assumption about the relationship between law and society.

Blog Entries

Taking Ourselves (and the Gospel) Seriously

Many of the China stories told by Christians inside and outside China are uplifting accounts of faith, of changed lives, and loving communities. There is clearly a disconnect between these voices and those that have unfortunately become mainstream within some evangelical circles. When it comes to their rhetoric about China and the Chinese, it is time for these Christian leaders to take themselves, as well as the gospel, seriously.

Blog Entries

An Earlier CSQ Look at Women in China

From the 2002 summer issue of ChinaSource Quarterly.

Blog Entries

Formed by Our Narratives

These narratives can also have a distorting effect upon those who employ them, for our China stories speak to more than simply what we think about China; they also reveal what we desire.

Blog Entries

Mao’s Black Box: Resilience and Religious Revival in Wenzhou

A Book Review

"It is curious, however, that to this day the Mao years remain the least studied period in the history of religion in modern China." This book helps fill that gap.

Blog Entries

End of an Era?

Welcoming a new reality even when it is at odds with the stories we have come to believe about China and about ourselves.

Blog Entries

When Our China Stories Ring Hollow

Thoughts about the violent demonstrations on the U.S. Capitol earlier this month.

Blog Entries

Variations on a Theme

Our China stories are not merely descriptions of an objective reality manifesting itself in the Chinese church; they speak to where we believe China’s church is (or should be) going.

Blog Entries

Seeing Things Differently

In proposing that we need to get beyond the “persecuted church” narrative, I am not advocating . . . that we leave it behind completely, but rather that we recognize its limits.