Tag: Chinese Education

Chinese Church Voices

God’s Way Is Higher than Our Way

The Journey of a Christian Family in China's Educational System

Ours is just one story among millions in China facing similar challenges. Due to the rigorous demands of the college entrance exams and pervasive competitive pressures in education, many Christian families here opt to send their children to unregistered Christian schools… [Our son], however, is among the few who remain within the Chinese educational system, compelled more by financial necessity than choice.

Blog Entries

Christian School Education in China

The suppression of Christian school education, combined with a law that restricts children under 18 from attending Sunday school, severely curtails the ability of the church to disciple its children. This is a strategic space to watch. May the church, and the education and discipleship of its youth, continue to grow. May God continue to open new doors.

Blog Entries

Homeschooling in China

A Growing Movement

After prayer and careful consideration, some parents decide to send their children to local schools. Others decide to homeschool. Our family tries to emphasize that both options are great, and the decision is ultimately up to the parents and where they believe God is leading them.

Blog Entries

Being a Family in China’s New Era

An interview with a Christian family navigating the changes and challenges of China today.

Blog Entries

The Students Who Taught the Teacher

It’s my prayer that one day all Chinese children with challenges like Hannah’s will pray to my God as well as have the educational opportunities they need.

Blog Entries

What China Offers

China has five main service groups currently helping children up to age 20 who have learning disabilities: government organizations, families, private schools and education companies, foreign workers, and local churches.

Supporting Article

Introducing Modern Chinese Education

Following a brief overview of the history of China’s educational system, the authors compare underlying Eastern and Western worldviews and then the practical implications these have for expatriates teaching in China.