Tag: Cross-Cultural

Blog Entries

Discipleship Distinctives in the Chinese Context

Although disciple making is a universal task with consistent components and principles rooted in scripture, unique discipleship distinctives can be found in every culture. Here are some discipleship distinctives found in the Chinese context.

Blog Entries

Theology in a Chinese Idiom

A Webinar on Reshaping the Conversation

Join us for a discussion of theology as an "idiomatic activity," expressing Christian thought in ways that are natural to a cultural native, looking specifically at key cultural material in Confucianism, Daoism, and Buddhism.

Blog Entries

End of an Era?

Welcoming a new reality even when it is at odds with the stories we have come to believe about China and about ourselves.

Blog Entries

Seeing the Same China, but for Different Reasons

The Importance of Exegeting Our Christian Culture

It is possible to agree on many things about China, yet still talk past one another.

Blog Entries

10 Quotes from Jesus, the Path to Human Flourishing by I’Ching Thomas

The presenter for our upcoming webinar, "How Relevant is the Gospel for the Chinese."

Blog Entries

The Impact of Buddhism

Even When It Is More Cultural than Belief

In Asian culture, often anyone who is born in a Buddhist country is considered a Buddhist. It’s not uncommon for people with a strong family identity to consider their family and religion together.

Blog Entries

Saving Face

In Chinese culture the concept of face is a very important part of social interaction and is specific to the group or family to which the person belongs.

Blog Entries

Cultivating Chinese Missionaries Faithfully and Realistically

There is a Chinese saying 《十年树木,百年树人》 which means, “It takes ten years to grow a tree but a hundred to cultivate a person.”

Blog Entries

Reciprocity—Goes Both Ways and Keeps on Going

Building relationships through sharing resources.

Blog Entries

Guanxi

Or, Do I Have to Give Them Something to Make Friends?

When we lived in Asia, I was constantly asked for things and especially for money. Being a typical American, I was offended with their constant asking. I discovered later that asking for favors was a means of developing relationships.