Tag: China Christian Council

Chinese Church Voices

Facial Recognition and the Church

It's quite common that people in China have to have their faces and identity cards scanned before being allowed into high-speed rail stations, but the same approach has triggered controversies when used in some churches. 

Chinese Church Voices

An Official Code of Conduct for China’s Pastors

Delineating nine areas of expectations for pastors in China. 

Chinese Church Voices

Celebrating the First Re-opened Church

In the spring of 1979, Ningbo Centennial Church became the first church in China to reopen its doors after the Cultural Revolution. 

Chinese Church Voices

Praying for a Good Harvest

The Tianjin CCC and TSPM hold a prayer and worship service as spring planting begins in rural areas. 

Chinese Church Voices

Three-Self Church Reflections on Revised Regulations

On September 7, 2017, the Chinese government released revised regulations on religious affairs that will take effect on February 1, 2018. Last month, Tianfeng Magazine, the official magazine of the China Christian Council (CCC) and Three-Self Patriotic Movement (TSPM), posted an article on their WeChat blog highlighting the impact of the regulations and why they are necessary. 

Chinese Church Voices

Churches Prepare for New Regulations

On September 7, 2017, the Chinese government released revised regulations on religious affairs that will take effect on February 1, 2018. Some local Chinese churches have started to study the regulations in order to prepare for the changes. China Christian Daily provides insight on how some churches are readying themselves.

Chinese Church Voices

How to Make the Church Chinese? Three Perspectives

The full title of this article is "How to Make the Church Chinese: Perspectives from the Religious, Academic, and Political Spheres" and is posted on the website of the China Christian Council/Three-Self Patriotic Movement (CCC/TSPM). Originally published in the official China Nationalities News, it examines the question of how Chinese the church is in China. While most Chinese Christians would likely agree that today's church is already Chinese both in character and leadership, many in the larger society have yet to acknowledge Christianity as genuinely a Chinese religion. The process of Sinicization, this writer argues, involves not only Christians themselves, but also China's intellectual and political elites.