Books by Jackson Wu

Jackson Wu

Jackson Wu (pseudonym) has a PhD in Applied Theology from Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary, having earned an MDiv (Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary), MA (Philosophy, Texas A&M), and a BS (Applied Mathematics, Texas A&M).

Wu is theologian-in-residence for Mission One, having previously served in East Asia first as a church planter and then as a professor for Chinese pastors.

He is the author of Saving God’s Face: A Chinese Contextualization of Salvation through Honor and Shame, One Gospel for All Nations: A Practical Approach to Biblical Contextualization and Reading Romans with Eastern Eyes: Honor and Shame in Paul’s Message and Mission as well as published journal articles. He maintains a blog at jacksonwu.org.

Books

Reading Romans through Eastern Eyes

Honor and Shame in Paul’s Message and Mission

Combining research from Asian scholars with his many years of experience living and working in East Asia, Jackson directs our attention to Paul's letter to the Romans. He argues that some traditional East Asian cultural values are closer to those of the first-century biblical world than common Western cultural values. In addition, he adds his voice to the scholarship engaging the values of honor and shame in particular and their influence on biblical interpretation.

Books

One Gospel for All Nations: A Practical Approach to Biblical Contextualization

The Bible tells us what to believe—the gospel. It also shows how to contextualize the gospel? In One Gospel for All Nations, Jackson Wu explains practically why we must not choose between the Bible and culture highlights implications for both missionaries and theologians. Contextualization should be practical, not pragmatic; theological, not theoretical.

Books

Saving God’s Face: A Chinese Contextualization of Salvation through Honor and Shame

EMS Dissertation Series

Years ago, the author had a startling realization. Theologians and pastors have long taught on the glory of God and its central importance in the Bible. However, because he was living in East Asia, it also dawned on the author that this sort of talk about God’s glory, praising Him, and magnifying His name was simply another way of talking about honor and shame.