Recently Added Chinese Church Voices

Chinese Church Voices—translations enabling the English-speaking community outside of China to listen in on conversations taking place within China’s online Christian community. Drawing from a variety of sources representing both the registered and unregistered Chinese churches, clergy and laity, we translate sermons, articles, blog posts, and micro-blogs that are written by Christians in China. 

The content we translate covers a wide spectrum of theological perspectives. The views represented are entirely those of the original author. Inclusion in Chinese Church Voices does not imply or equal an endorsement by ChinaSource


Apr 4

A Chinese Missionary to Nepal (Part 1)

by ChinaSource Team

What is it like for Chinese Christians to engage in cross-cultural missions outside of China? An increasing number of Chinese Christians have the opportunity to serve short-term abroad. Their experiences abroad offer valuable lessons for future indigenous mission efforts by the Chinese church. In this interview, translated from Territory, the author testifies to God's hand in the "twists and turns" of his life. His testimony gives a look into the heart and mind of a Chinese Christian and the spiritual renewal and transformation he undergoes while living, serving, and sharing the gospel abroad. This is part one.

Mar 28

Rethinking Youth Ministry

by ChinaSource Team

Do Chinese parents and pastors need to rethink how they raise their youth in the faith? In this article, originally posted on at Gospel Times, a pastor encourages believers to challenge traditional views of ministry to youth. The pastor sketches modern challenges to youth ministry and then offers practical recommendations for ministry workers.

Mar 21

Church Staff Salary—How Much Is Enough?

by ChinaSource Team

Chinese Christians have traditionally expected their pastors to live frugally and to receive little to no compensation for their pastoral duties. It was expected that those in the ministry would endure much suffering as a result of their call to ministry. As a result, some pastors and ministry staff live on quite meager means and many are bi-vocational in order to make ends meet.

As China modernizes, many congregations, particularly urban churches, recognize a need to better financially care for their pastors, as well as to invest in the well-being of the congregation as a whole. Congregations are starting to see the health of a church improve when the entire body is spiritually and financially committed to compensating their ministry staff. So, how much should a pastor in China make?

Mar 14

Why You Don’t Need to Be a Communist to Serve the People

by ChinaSource Team

Can Christians join the Communist Party? Should Christians join the Communist Party? These questions were posted online recently by a Chinese Christian on Zhihu, China’s version of Quora (a question and answer website). The questions sparked chatter among the online Christian community and also prompted a response from the official social media account of the Communist Youth League of China.

Mar 7

Have We Failed Returnee Christians? (Part 2)

by ChinaSource Team

Last week we posted the first part of an article about returnee Christians who fall away from the church that was originally published on the blog The Gift of the Magi. The article discusses how Chinese living abroad come to Christianity but struggle to remain in the church after they return to China. Part one focused more on the overseas church, while part two looks closely at the church in mainland China. This week we post part two of the article with Chinese readers’ comments from the original blog.

Feb 28

Have We Failed Returnee Christians? (Part 1)

by ChinaSource Team

The number of Chinese Christians continues to grow, both inside and outside of China. As large numbers of Chinese move and travel abroad, particularly to the West, many encounter Christianity for the first time. Many of these Chinese come to faith while abroad. After living abroad, Chinese Christians often have trouble transitioning into church life once they return to China. Their experience of the overseas church is often dramatically different from their experiences in Chinese churches. Brother Sang Shang, a returnee himself, highlights the difficulties returnee Christians face when they return to China.

Feb 21

Why the Urban Church Needs to Care for Migrant Workers

by ChinaSource Team

China’s economic boom has turned the country seemingly overnight from a largely rural based population into a majority urban-based society. Migrant workers from the countryside, including many Christian migrants, have flocked to urban areas in search of better economic prospects. Urban populations have swelled, but so have tensions. Migrants lack access to public services and are often regarded by city residents as inferior. Yet, most city residents acknowledge city life would largely come to a halt without migrant labor. The following article is a helpful peek into how the church can respond to China’s urbanization.

Feb 14

The Hardships of Pastoral Ministry in China

by ChinaSource Team

Pastoral ministry is typically not a desired vocation among Chinese Christians. Although pastors in China are revered for their rich spiritual gifts and selfless service to the church, pastoral ministry itself is poor, lonely, and draining. In this article from Green Olive Books, the author, a layperson, highlights the difficulties of being a pastor in China, as well as the need for Chinese Christians to better support their pastors. 

Feb 7

Christian Suffering: Remembering Xu Guoyong

by ChinaSource Team

Late last year, a Christian crowdfunding drive made headlines and sparked controversy on Chinese social media. Luo Er, the father of a five-year-old girl with leukemia, posted an article online in which he vented his frustration at God. Luo demanded that Jesus heal his daughter otherwise he would stop believing in him. Thousands of people read the article and donated over 2 million RMB ($290,000USD) to help pay for the medical expenses of the family. Tragically, Luo’s daughter died shortly after Luo started the campaign. Luo was later arrested for fraud and fined. Chinese Christians have hotly debated the incident, many questioning Luo’s intentions and asking how Christians should respond in the midst of such suffering. One response to these questions of suffering comes from a writer for OC Gospel. “Rachel” reflects on the Luo incident by remembering another tragic story of Christian suffering.