ChinaSource Blog

Social Media in China

Why Social Matters

ChinaSource Blog by Joab Meyer

From the series Social Media in China

Social media is impacting societies across the globe, but China's social technology landscape is unique and largely unknown to those outside China. Honestly, how many people outside of China have ever heard of any of the popular social technology brands listed in the image below?

A New NGO Law Coming?

ChinaSource Blog by Joann Pittman

On January 16, 2015, the magazine China Briefing reported that a new Charity Law, which has been in the drafting stage for months has finally been introduced as a bill in the National People’s Congress (NPC). The establishment of laws governing social organizations (NGOs) has long been rumored and hoped for in China, by domestic and foreign enterprises alike. Many Christian organizations are hopeful that a new law will make it easier for them to operate in China. Here’s what the article has to say about the draft law:

Worshiping in Chinese (3)

How Chinese Church Feeds Me

ChinaSource Blog by Swells in the Middle Kingdom

From the series Worshiping in Chinese

This series of blog entries refers primarily to the question of expatriate Christians attending services at registered—or at least publicly “open”—Chinese churches. It is assumed that in most cases, the risks to local believers (and to the expat workers as well) are such that it would be irresponsible to participate regularly in unregistered church services. Part one dealt with some of the common objections to attending Chinese church services. In part two some of the main reasons why I have chosen to attend Chinese church services were given. Part three lists some of the ways I have been blessed by my attendance at Chinese church services.

Pentecostal Theology and the Chinese Church

ChinaSource Blog by Robert Menzies

A look at the impact and continuing influence of Pentecostal theology in the Chinese church.

Cultural Values, Mapped

ChinaSource Blog by Joann Pittman

Crossing a cultural boundary inevitably leads to cultural clashes. Sometimes the clashes occur at the point of behaviors and customs, such as eating, drinking, or even how to cross a street. More often, however, the clashes occur at the deeper level of cultural values — beliefs about what is right and wrong or how how the world ought to be ordered.

Worshiping in Chinese (2)

Why I Go to Chinese Church

ChinaSource Blog by Swells in the Middle Kingdom

From the series Worshiping in Chinese

This series of blog entries refers primarily to the question of expatriate Christians attending services at registered—or at least publicly “open”—Chinese churches. It is assumed that in most cases, the risks to local believers (and to the expat workers as well) are such that it would be irresponsible to participate regularly in unregistered church services. Part one dealt with some of the common objections to attending Chinese church services. In part two some of the main reasons why I have chosen to attend Chinese church services are given. Part three lists some of the ways I have been blessed by my attendance at Chinese church services.

An Indiana Zuotan (Informal Discussion)

ChinaSource Blog by Joann Pittman

Last week, on my way home from giving two days of lectures at Taylor University, I had the opportunity to visit the Center on Religion and Chinese Society, at Purdue University in Lafayette, IN. 

The Changing Face of Urban Mission

Encouraging Dialogue between East and West

ChinaSource Blog by Easten Law

In recent months I have been delighted by the exposure Chinese Church Voices has provided to indigenous perspectives on faith and mission.  The simple blog provides an important window for non-Chinese speakers into questions Chinese Christians are raising.  In turn, it provides those of us in the West with an opportunity for greater dialogue and understanding.

Worshiping in Chinese

Why Cross-Cultural Workers Don't Go to Chinese Church

ChinaSource Blog by Swells in the Middle Kingdom

From the series Worshiping in Chinese

This series of blog entries refers primarily to the question of expatriate Christians attending Chinese services at registered—or at least publicly "open"—local churches. It is assumed that in most cases, the risks to local believers (and to the expat workers as well) are such that it would be irresponsible to participate regularly in unregistered church services. Part one deals with some of the common objections to attending Chinese church services. In part two some of the main reasons why I have chosen to attend Chinese church services will be given. Part three will list some of the ways I have been blessed by my attendance at Chinese church services.

Most-Read Posts on "Chinese Church Voices"

ChinaSource Blog by ChinaSource Team

Have you been keeping up with our publication Chinese Church Voices? If not, here are the five most popular posts of 2014 that you may have missed.

Feedback